Curriculum Vitae

Welcome to my curriculum vitae. Below you'll find information on my academic background and links to my published work. For sample course syllabi, see the Sample Syllabi tab.


AoS: Thomas Aquinas, Medieval Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Logic


AoC: Ancient Philosophy, Thomistic Ethics and Anthropology, Philosophy of Religion


Table of Contents

Academic Assignments

Academic Assignments


Assistant Professor, Pre-Theology (Philosophy), St. John Vianney Theological Seminary, August, 2024–.


Adjunct Faculty, Philosophy, University of St. Thomas (Houston, TX), May, 2020–May, 2024.


Service Work and Other Work

Copyeditor, The Catholic University of America Press, June 2020–present


Referee for American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, 2019–present

Education

PhD cand., Philosophy, The Center for Thomistic Studies at the University of St. Thomas (TX)

Dissertation: “Thomas Aquinas on the Accidentality and Essentiality of Being in Light of His Arabic and Logico-Grammatical Sources”

Director: Brian Carl. Committee: Thomas Osborne, Domenic D’Ettore

 

MA, Philosophy, The Center for Thomistic Studies at the University of St. Thomas (TX) (summa cum laude), May 2019

 

BA, Philosophy, Economics, Catholic studies, University of St. Thomas (MN) (summa cum laude)

Scholarly Publications


Presentations

Reading Groups & Seminars

Uncertainty, Confidence, and Truth in the Sciences: Thomistic Philosophy and Natural Science Symposium, sponsored by the Thomistic Institute, The Catholic University of America, July 12–16, 2023.


Aquinas and "the Arabs" International Working Group (AAIWG), “Luis Xavier López-Farjeat, Classical Islamic Philosophy: A Thematic Introduction,” organized by Atefe Esmaili, Seth Kreeger, Nicoletta Nativo, Pooya Heybatollahi, Richard Taylor, Fall 2022–Spring 2023.


The City of God and Modernity: Culture and Ecclesiology, sponsored by the Institute for Human Ecology and the Thomistic Institute, The Catholic University of America, June 12–17, 2022.

Select Awards / Grants

Leo Elders Junior Scholar Essay Contest ($750)

Sponsor: Leo Elders Foundation

Title: "Why Are Accidents Included under Being per se?"

Thomas D. Sullivan Medal for Best Undergraduate Philosophical Essay ($500)

Sponsor: University of St. Thomas (MN), Philosophy Department

Title: “What to Make of Modes of Names: Filling an Important Gap in Aristotle’s On Interpretation


Delta Epsilon Sigma National Research Essay Contest Champion ($500)

Topic: From Theology to Art: How the Development of Dominican Theology Motivated the Preaching of Dominican Sponsored Artists


Young Scholars Research Grant ($4,000)

Sponsor: University of St. Thomas (MN), Grants and Research Office

Topic: Special Relativity without the Fourth Dimension: Interpreting Einstein’s Physics with Aristotle’s Definition of Motion

Mentor: Thomas Feeney, PhD, MPhil, MSt


Collaborative Inquiry Grant ($1,500)

Sponsor: University of St. Thomas (MN), Grants and Research Office

Topic: Biology’s Accidental Species: The Compatibility of Multiple True Taxonomies with Aristotelian Essentialism

Mentor: Mark Spenser, PhD


Center of the American Experiment, Research Assistant ($1,500)

Mentor: Mitch Pearlstein, PhD

Topic: How Religious Institutions and Leaders Can Better Promote Healthy Marriages

Dissertation

Title: “Thomas Aquinas on the Accidentality and Essentiality of Being in Light of His Arabic and Logico-Grammatical Sources”

 

Description: This dissertation addresses ongoing debates concerning St. Thomas’s apparently incompatible claims about the accidentality and essentiality of being (esse) to creatures. It offers a significant revision of standard accounts both of the substance of his doctrine and its sources. Since Pierre Duhem and Étienne Gilson, it has usually been thought that Aquinas derives his teaching on the accidentality of esse to creatures from Avicenna by way of William of Auvergne and that his understanding of esse as an “act” was his own unique contribution to Avicennian thought. Very little attention has been given, however, to the Latin text of Averroes used by Aquinas or to the precedence for his technical terminology—his phrase “substantial being” (esse substantiale) and his notion of esse as an “act”—in the twelfth- and early thirteenth-century Latin logico-grammatical traditions. I argue that when attention is given to these understudied sources, it becomes clear that Aquinas’s notion of esse as composed with creatures as an “act” is not at all Avicennian. On the contrary, it is a critique of William of Auvergne’s novel Avicennian interpretation of Boethius in favor of a more traditional, twelfth-century one, formulated in language inspired both by Averroes’s Metaphysics commentary and the earlier Latin logico-grammatical tradition.

 

Dissertation Outline:

Ch0: Introduction.

Ch1: Recent Attempts to Solve the Problem of the Accidentality and Essentiality of Being.

Ch2: The Modern Origins of the Existential Reading of Aquinas in Maritain, Gilson, and Wippel.

Ch3: Why is Every Predication a Predication of Being.

Ch4: Being per accidens and per se.

Ch5: Aquinas’s Averroistic Critique of William of Auvergne and Avicenna.

Ch6: The Essentiality of Being: What is “Esse substantiale”? Why is Esse an “Act” and “Accident”?